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Hancock Field Motorcycle Safety Course

The 174th Attack Wing safety office facilitated a motorcycle safety course for the wing at Hancock Air National Guard base, Syracuse, N.Y. The safety course training is required by Air Force Instruction for all personnel who ride a motorcycle on or off duty. The course will be given on different days during the month of June and July. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Barbara Olney)

The 174th Attack Wing safety office facilitated a motorcycle safety course for the wing at Hancock Air National Guard base, Syracuse, N.Y. The safety course training is required by Air Force Instruction for all personnel who ride a motorcycle on or off duty. The course will be given on different days during the month of June and July. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Barbara Olney)

Hancock Field Air National Guard Base, New York --

HANCOCK FIELD AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, SYRACUSE, N.Y. – With the warm weather upon us motorcycles are more prominent on the roads. Safety is a big concern being out on the roads. Motorcycle riders must complete a motorcycle safety class regardless if they intend to register their vehicles on the installation.

Every year the New York Air National Guard’s 174th Attack Wing hosts a safety motorcycle class. Instructors are brought in to teach riders motorcycle safety procedures and techniques.

Per AFI 91-207 initial training must be completed unless the member has a valid license, permit or an endorsement, completed state approved training or Motorcycle Safety Foundation® training. Refresher training must be complete every 5 years.

“The Air Force loses on average 20 to 30 riders a year by fatalities. It can be a dangerous vehicle if proper safety procedures aren’t learned and practiced,” said Mr. Dave Roe, 174th Attack Wing, 174th Occupational Safety Manager.

The training is taught on the former upper ramp of the base. The safety office painted yellow lines on the pavement that will help direct the obstacle course. Orange cones are also used to provide directional turns and narrowing curves.

Master Sergeant Scott Simpson has been riding for over 20 years. “The class is a great refresher to help you get better acquainted with your motorcycle, practicing and testing your slow riding, tight turning and restricted space maneuverability skills,” said Simpson.

Senior Master Sergeant Eric Lent has been riding for 7 years. “Over time bad habits can be developed. With the assistance of the instructors and the member identifying what those bad habits are they can be corrected,” said Lent.

The motorcycle safety course will be available until the end of July. If you have any questions reach out to the safety office at 315-233-2143.